Master KG Jerusalema – Music Beyond Culture and Lyrics

Master KG Jerusalema

Sparing you all the technical jargons, it explains the relationship between music and culture. It stresses that music is a window to culture, and that culture will always influence music.

Well, with the massive influence of social media and the internet at large, the idea behind ethnomusicology has to accommodate a new definition. The viral song Jerusalema is a typical example.

Although released in South Africa and presented in the Zulu language, the acceptance of the song has stunned music experts, the producers, and even the song’s artist.

The amazing thing is how people from different cultures, beliefs, and locations have accepted the song without understanding the lyrics of the song. This goes to say how popular music acceptance is not hindered by the language barrier.

 

Frankly, if we will choose to learn from history, it is not the first time this is happening. In 1972 for instance, Bob Marley was unveiled to the world by Island Record. He was from a third-world country but went on to make his mark on the sand of time.

Although most of Bob Marley’s songs were expressed in a popular language (English), his usual religious belief – Rastafarian; did not stand in the way of the world accepting him. Years down the line after his demise, learning a thing or two from their experience with Bob Marley, Island record went on to sign Nigeria’s King Sunny Ade (KSA).

For a fact, KSA could not feel in the vacuum left by Bob Marley but was still accepted despite his music expressed in the Nigerian Yoruba language. As a matter of fact, he even went on to perform in some Hollywood movies which is the height of corporate entertainments
acceptance.

In light of all this, we can safely say that entertainment and popular music is not deterred by lingual and cultural undertone. With the right publicity and blend of creativity, the world will sing and dance to any music without understanding a word of what it means.

This is the situation with Master KG’s Jerusalema which has found its way into the lips of everyone across the continent.

In fact, it will interest you to know that the  Jerusalema dance challenge did not start in South Africa. It began in Angola (another African country), extended to Portugal (a country in Europe), and has reached everywhere.

Conclusively, the world is full of proof about how popular music is not restricted by cultural and language undertones.

So, major key players must begin to see music as a tool for triggering the needed global change that the world needs. This is in the area of climate change, ending police brutality, and many more.

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